New Braunfels Edition | August 2021

NEWBRAUNFELS EDITION

2021 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 9 AUG. 6SEPT. 2, 2021

renovations to existing campuses. FOR STUDENTS FINDING THE SPACE COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

Comal ISD and New Braunfels ISD are gearing up for November bond elections with propositions aimed at building new schools to accommodate the growing student population, technology upgrades and

COMAL ISD

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IMPACTS

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2021

$527.7M Proposed bond total:

PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

new schools 4

upgrades 2

stadium expansions/

SPONSORED BY • The Pillars Christian Learning Center

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for teacher and student computer upgrades $34.54M

DISTRICT DATA

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Playground upgrades at all elementary schools

Upgrades to the Canyon Lake High School football stadium are included in the bond proposal. (Courtesy Steve Stanford)

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$450M Proposed bond total:

BUSINESS FEATURE

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COMPLETE Long Creek High School REBUILD New Braunfels High School

school 1

new elementary

to upgrade New Braunfels High School press box and eld turf $8M

Funds to expand the current NewBraunfels Ninth Grade Center are included in the bond. (Lauren Canterberry/Community Impact Newspaper)

DINING FEATURE

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SOURCES: COMAL ISD, NEW BRAUNFELS ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2021

Family Owned & Operated Serving New Braunfels and surrounding areas for over 40 years

Time for fall Tomatoes and Peppers! Don’t forget to get your seeds of Beans, Cucumbers, Squash, and more! FALL VEGETABLES

956 NWalnut Ave, New Braunfels, Texas 78130 • (830) 629-2401

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMHEATHER: Please help me welcome our new editor, Eric Weilbacher. He was excited to get back into journalism, and we are happy to have him for the New Braunfels and San Marcos/Buda/Kyle editions. Feel free to reach out to Eric with story ideas. This issue is our annual Public Education Edition in which we share district data, a look at a new middle school and other pertinent education news (see pages 13-23). Heather Demere, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMERIC: As the coming school year is taking shape, we look at the performance of students in Comal ISD and New Braunfels ISD and what we can learn from any learning lost in the previous school year. What are the challenges to ramping students back up, and how will the districts approach them? We also look at the bond elections each district is proposing to address continued growth in our community. Eric Weilbacher, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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El Luchador Tacos and Enchiladas

CREEKSIDE CROSSING

COURTESY EL LUCHADOR TACOS AND ENCHILADAS

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5 HomeWell Care Services , a national in-home care franchise, opened an agency in New Braunfels at 1067 FM 306, Ste. 603, in early July. The new location will serve seniors and others in need of home care in Blanco, Dripping Springs, Kyle, Buda, San Marcos and New Braunfels. Owners Meredith and Jeff Clark will host a grand opening event Aug. 17 at 4:30 p.m. 830-214-2059. www.homewellcares.com 6 Opened in June, Hunter Valley Social features a renovated late 1800s barn that can be used for corporate events, parties and weddings. Located at 6390 FM 1102, New Braunfels the venue has a barbecue station on-site. 830-627-4566. www.facebook.com/huntervalleysocial 7 On Aug. 2, MindWorks Clinical and Counseling Psychology opened a new location at 2115 Stephens Place, Ste. 730, New Braunfels. The office is Mind Works’ third location in the San Antonio area, and each practice offers psychological testing, psychotherapy, medication-assisted treat- ment and counseling services for children, adolescents and families. 210-366-3700. www.mindworkstx.com 8 The Pilates Shoppe opened at 167 S. Seguin Ave., New Braunfels, on Aug. 2 after hosting a soft opening during the last week of July. The well- ness studio offers yoga, barre and Pilates classes as well as infrared sauna and compression therapy. 830-632-5033. www.thepilatesshoppe.com COMING SOON 9 El Luchador Tacos and Enchiladas is slated to open at 123 S. Union Ave., New Braunfels, in early August. The restaurant

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NOWOPEN 1 Ash & Tay Collective , a new boutique, opened at 453 S. Seguin Ave., New Braunfels, on July 14. The shop offers women’s clothing, jewelry, hats and apparel for toddlers. 830-832-4553. www.shopashandtay.com 2 Bayseas Seafood Restaurant No. 30 held a soft opening July 1 and a grand opening Aug. 1. It is located inside the Exxon gas station at 486 Landa St.,

New Braunfels. The restaurant offers fried catfish, fried shrimp, fish tacos and more. 210-428-5545. 3 On July 10, BinDrop TX held a grand opening for its new location at 651 N. Business I-35, Ste. 530, New Braunfels. The store sells overstock and returned items from a variety of brands and companies and everything in the store is the same price. Prices drop daily beginning at $8 on Saturdays and ending at $1 on Thursdays. The store is closed

Fridays for restocking. 512-962-7189. www.bindroptx.com 4 Casa Decor opened a second New Braunfels location at 651 Business I-35, Ste. 840, in July. The shop offers handmade rustic, Southwest and Hill Country-style furniture and home accessories. In addition to the new location, the store also operates another location in New Braunfels and a shop in El Paso. 830-837-5648. www.casadecortex.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY & ERIC WEILBACHER

herbs and acupuncture and specializes in metabolic disorders, chronic pain and autoimmune disorders. 830-822-6315. www.comalspringsacupuncture.com REOPENING 13 On May 17, the Friends’ Bookstore reopened at the New Braunfels Public Library, 700 E. Common St., New Braunfels. All proceeds from the bookstore are donated to support programming for children, teenagers and adults at the library. 830-627-7824. www.friendsofthenewbraunfels publiclibrary.com ANNIVERSARIES 14 On July 7, The Buttermilk Cafe celebrated 10 years in business at 1324 Common St., New Braunfels. Chef Carol Irwin has curated breakfast and lunch menus that include upscale comfort food. 830-625-8700. www.thebuttermilkcafe.com 15 Johnson Furniture Co. celebrated 55 years in business at its 283 S. Seguin Ave., New Braunfels, store this July. Since 1966 the shop has sold furniture, art, lamps and accessories in a variety of styles and price ranges. 830-625-5321. Rehabilitation Hospital celebrated 10 years of providing care to area patients in July. Located at 2041 Sundance Parkway, New Braunfels, the hospital is a member of Ernest Health and offers specialized inpatient and outpatient services for those recovering from injuries, illness or chronic medical www.johnsonfurnitureco.com 16 New Braunfels Regional

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Comal Springs Acupuncture

Apple Seeds Apartments will provide training and affordable housing to area residents.

LAUREN CANTERBERRY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RENDERING COURTESY NEW BRAUNFELS FOOD BANK

hosted several soft opening events throughout late July and will serve a variety of tacos, enchiladas, appetizers and salsas. 830-609-9022. www.elluchadortx.com 10 Wes Peoples Homes LLC has joined the planned Solms Landing community in an effort to bring more affordable homes to New Braunfels. Solms Landing, a 98-acre master-planned development, is located east of I-35 in the Creekside area near Resolute Health Hospital and Buc-ees. Development on an additional 117 homes priced in the $200,000 range is anticipated to begin late this summer. The homes will range from 875-1,375 square feet, and each property will be equipped with remote technology to allow owners to control locks, air conditioning and more while away from home. 512-994-4151. www.wespeopleshomes.com RELOCATIONS 11 The Comal County Senior Citizens Foundation , located at 655 Landa St., New Braunfels, will soon move into the old YMCA building at 710 Landa St. Work to renovate the more than 20,000-square-foot facility is underway and is expected to be completed by the end of the year. 830-629-4547. www.nbsenior.org 12 Comal Springs Acupuncture relocated to 618 B Comal Ave., New Braunfels, at the end of July. The business was previously housed in the Reimer Building, 219 E. San Antonio St., Ste. F, New Braunfels, and is relocating following the sale of the building. Acupuncturist Tim Nicosia treats a variety of ailments with

FEATURED IMPACT COMMUNITY As rising housing costs throughout Central Texas push many area workers to live outside of the city in which they work, the New Braunfels Food Bank and area nonprots are working to bring a more aordable option to the city. In June, food bank sta and representatives of local organizations attended a groundbreaking ceremony for the Apple Seeds Apartments , a $9 million apartment complex at 1530 S. Seguin Ave., New Braunfels. The 51 units will provide housing for families at below-market rents for 24 to 36 months, said Eric Cooper, San Antonio Food Bank president and CEO. “It’s really dealing with individuals that are working in New Braunfels that are struggling with the aordability of rent and the inability to gain equity,” Cooper said. “There is a real lack of inventory to meet the demand.” While living in the apartments, a portion of each resident’s rent will be put into a savings account that they will receive access to upon graduating from the program, Cooper said. The goal of the community will be to provide residents not just a stable place to live, but also access to healthy food, opportunities to learn about assistance options, and nancial and career training. Eli Woolsey, president of Woolsey Construction, is part of the team heading

up the project and has been involved in the development for several years. Project leaders anticipate welcoming the rst residents in fall 2022, a goal that leaves just over a year for construction to be completed. “I think the challenge has been and will be to meet a year build time,” Woolsey said. “The industry as a whole has been just backed up with the lack of building materials available and price escalation.” Much of the funding needed to build the complex has been secured, Woolsey said, but the food bank is still seeking determined, Cooper said his team will begin accepting applications this fall. “That opportunity to possibly live and work within a community is something that we desire for these participants,” Cooper said. “It’s a much bigger movement and work than just 51 apartments run by the food bank.” donations to fund the work. Though the rent has not been

conditions. 830-837-8684. www.nbrrh.ernesthealth.com NEWOWNERSHIP

17 Central Texas Cryotherapy , which is located at 2163 Stephens Place, is under new ownership. Danielle Diers assumed ownership in May. It is a cryotherapy studio that offers whole-body as well as localized and facial cryo, infrared sauna, compression therapy, a CBD-infused oxygen bar and more. 830-387-4050. www.centraltexascryo.com

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Doing everything but the packing!

Exit Premier Realty Holly Gottschalt, GRI, CNE, ePro Broker Associate 210-883-4399 www.HollyGHomes.com

The Original No Drama Realtor!

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2021

TODO LIST

August & September events

Extension Service to learn more about gardening. The day will begin with a speaker and includes breakout sessions focused on topics such as Junior Master Gardener, Learn Grow Eat and Grow and Literature in the Garden. Comal Master Gardeners will also teach attendees about insects found in the garden, nontraditional gardening, food and tness, propagation and more topics. Educators can incorporate information learned into their own lessons. Lunch will be provided. Free. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Courtyard by Marriott New Braunfels River Village, 750 I-35 N., New Braunfels. 830-620-3440. [email protected] 13 TOMMY HOWELL: AN EVENING OFMUSIC & STORYTELLING Hosted by the Brauntex Theatre, Texas Boot Company and Hill Country Comicon, Tommy Howell and his band will perform original songs combined with stories about the creation of the songs. 7:30 p.m. $40 (general admission), $60 (VIP seating and a meet and greet). Brauntex Theatre, 290 W. San Antonio St., New Braunfels. 830-627-0808. www.brauntex.org 13 RESTORATION TOUR: INVASIVE SPECIES During this morning tour at the Headwaters at the Comal, learn to identify some of the most common invasive plants, insects and animals in the hill country and learn how invasive species impact the local ecosystem. All ages welcome. Free (Headwaters at the Comal member), $3 (youth ages 6-17), $4 (military, rst responder, educator or college student) or $5 (general adult admission). 9-10 a.m. 333 E. Klingemann St., New Braunfels. 830-608-8937. www.headwatersatthecomal.com 14 THROUGH 15 HILL COUNTRY COMICON Join comic lovers from around the region at this family-friendly comic convention. Comic creators and celebrity guests will be in attendance and visitors can purchase comic books, toys, cards, games, artwork and more. 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. (Saturday), 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (Sunday). $10-$25 (day passes), $60-$80 (weekend passes), $100-$150 (VIP). Float the Guadalupe River before an afternoon of concerts during the inaugural River Rodeo Fest. Hosted by Rockin’ R River Rides, Lone Star Beer and Sendero Provisions Co., the festival will include performances by nine bands including Houndmouth and Wilderado. The event will benet the Texas Food & Wine Alliance, an organization that provides grants, educational programs and events to benet the South Texas culinary community. Noon. Free (children ages 12 and under), $85 www.hillcountrycomicon.com 14 RIVER RODEO FEST (general admission), $300 (VIP access). Rockin’ R River Rides, 1405 Gruene Road, New Braunfels. www.facebook.com/ riverrodeofest

NOW HIRING

AUG. 27

RESTORATION TOUR HEADWATERS AT THE COMAL

Learn about the pollinators that play an integral role in supporting the Hill Country ecosystems. Sta of the Headwaters at the Comal will speak about the diversity of host plants and pollinators found in the restored prairie. 9-10 a.m. Free (Headwaters at the Comal members), $3-$5. 333 E. Klingemann St., New Braunfels. 830-608-8937. www.headwatersatthecomal.com (Courtesy Headwaters at the Comal)

Picking, Receiving, Restock, Forklift and Shipping for warehouse in South New Braunfels Apply at www.goretailgroup.com or in person at 175 Southwestern Ave., Suite 110 South New Braunfels (Off I35, exit 184 Rueckle Rd.) (512) 444-3555

AUGUST 06 THROUGH08

PEDDLER SHOW

INNEWBRAUNFELS The Peddler Show travels through Texas each year and will make a stop in New Braunfels to showcase a variety of small businesses. Visitors can purchase items from designers, artisans, creators and crafters from around the country. Fri. noon-6 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free (age 12 and under, teachers, military personnel, rst responders and medical personnel), $5 (single-day admission), $8 (weekend pass). New Braunfels Civic/Convention Center, 375 S. Castell Ave., New Braunfels. LANDA PARKADVENTURERS Children ages 9-13 can experience a variety of outdoor activities at the day camp. Attendees will visit the aquatic center, mini golf course, Panther Canyon and will participate in a paint ght. www.peddlershow.com 09 THROUGH 13 $55 per child. 9 a.m.-noon daily. Pavilion Six, Landa Park, Landa Park Drive, New Braunfels. 830-221-4350. www.nbtexas.org 12 MOVIE NIGHT AT THE FIRE HOUSE Visit New Braunfels Fire Station No. 4 for an evening of entertainment. Tours of the station will be available from 6-7 p.m., followed by a showing of Disney’s “Planes: Fire & Rescue” on a 144-inch projection screen inside the truck bay. Popcorn and other snacks will be provided and guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blankets. Free. 6-8:30 p.m. 2210 Alyssa Way, New Braunfels. 830-221-4200 13 FALL GARDENING FOR EDUCATORS All educators are welcome to join the Comal County Texas A&M AgriLife

New Braunfels’ The “Tooth Fairy”

385 Landa Street, New Braunfels, TX smilepediatricdentalcare.com 830-327-7007 PEDIATRIC DENTIST – TONGUE/LIP TIE PREFERRED PROVIDER Lela Matthes-Matos Board-Certified The Breathe Institute Ambassador

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

The parade consists of 10 oats decorated with illuminated lanterns. (Courtesy San Antonio River Walk)

WORTH THE TRIP FordParade of Lanterns Aug. 2729, Sept. 0305

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Take a trip to downtown San Antonio to witness the annual Ford Parade of Lanterns. Each year, 26-foot-long boats lled with large illuminated lanterns oat through the downtown portion of the River Walk, beginning at the International Center, 203 S. St. Mary’s St., San Antonio. Viewers can watch the LIVEMUSIC GRUENE HALL 1281 Gruene Road, New Braunfels 830-606-1281 www.gruenehall.com AUGUST 12 Citizen Cope 1314 Hayes Carll 25 Kevin Costner & Modern West 27 Randall King LONE STAR FLOAT HOUSE AND GRILL 7430 River Road, New Braunfels 830-907-3866 www.lonestaroathouse.com AUGUST 08 Copper Chief 15 Tyler Cannon 22 BlaineFest with Eric Middleton 29 John Dempsy 14 POP 2000 TOUR Hosted by 1836 Entertainment Group, Lance Bass of NSYNC, Sylver Spoon Restaurant and more, the Pop 2000 Tour will feature performances by O-Town, Ryan Cabrera and LFO. The tour is scheduled to stop in multiple cities throughout the country where audiences will hear performances of some of the most popular songs of the early 2000s. All ages welcome. 6 p.m. $30-$40 (early bird tickets), $60 (advanced general admission), $500 (preferred table for four) or $800 (VIP table for four).

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parade from businesses and public areas that line the river. 9-10 p.m. Free. 849 E. Commerce St., San Antonio. www.thesanantonioriverwalk.com

PHOENIX SALOON 193 W. San Antonio St., New Braunfels 830-643-1400 www.thephoenixsaloon.com AUGUST 13 Blackbird Sing 14 3 Man Front 20 Soul Ethos 21 Dead Weight, Nuclear Nation & Mexfats 27 Natalie Rose Band 28 Uptown RED BIRD LISTENING ROOM 1260 S. Business I-35, New Braunfels 830-606-7886 www.redbirdlisteningroom.com AUGUST 08 Courtney Patton TSR Texas Ski Ranch, 6700 N. Interstate 35, New Braunfels. 830-627-2843 www.pop2000tour.com 21 CREEPY CRITTERS Children in kindergarten through third grade will learn about the creepy, crawly critters that live in South Texas. Participants will be taught which bugs are safe, which are dangerous and even which bugs taste the best during this outdoor event. 10-11 a.m. $3-$5. Headwaters at the Comal, 333 E. Klingemann St., New Braunfels. 830-608-8937. www.headwatersatthecomal.com 15 Dallas Burrow 22 Kevin Galloway 29 Jason Eady

Consumption Use Alerts Customers can set up hourly, daily, or even weekly threshold alerts.

The consumption use alerts feature notifies customers when their water and electric usage exceeds a customer-selected threshold. The notifications give customers actionable information to stop high usage before it continues. To sign up for consumption use alerts, customers must have a smart meter installed and be in the New Braunfels Utilities electricity service area.

Learn how to set up alerts at nbutexas.com/conservation or call 830.629.8400 .

Find more or submit New Braunfels events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Major I35 projects in NewBraunfels cross the halfway point

Once complete, these major TxDOT projects along I-35 in New Braunfels will create updated ramps and frontage roads, and add park and ride facilities. DRIVING TO THE FINISH

ONGOING PROJECTS

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58% COMPLETE

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Three I-35 construction projects aimed at improving safety and mobility near New Braunfels continue to prog- ress, as all are over 50% complete. The projects will update ramps, frontage roads and park and ride facilities along the roadway. The Texas Department of Transpor- tation is leading the projects that will cost a total of $107 million. “Weather has impacted progress on all the jobs, but at this point we cannot determine if this will impact nal completion,” TxDOT spokesperson Laura Lopez said. The portion that runs from FM 306 to the Hays-Comal County border began in February 2020 and is 58% complete. TxDOT ocials anticipate that the $63.8 million segment will be completed by June 2022. The project between Guadalupe

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Lakeview Boulevard Improvements The Lakeview Boulevard improvement project stretches from California Boulevard to East Torrey Street. Work includes pavement rehabilitation, milling and overlay. The project is part of the $15 million New Braunfels City- wide Streets Improvement Program. Timeline: November 2020- August 2021 Cost: $15 million (for all citywide streets improvement program) Funding source: city of New Braunfels 2019 bond

COST: $18.4 MILLION

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Schwab Road:

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SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

River and FM 306 began in September 2019 and is 63% completed. It is expected to be complete by January 2022 and costs $18.4 million. Improvements from that project include frontage road widening from 1.3 miles south of FM 306 to FM 306, operational improvements at FM 306,

and sidewalks and curb ramps at the FM 306 intersection. The stretch from FM 2252 to Schwab Road is expected to be nished in December and costs $24.6 million. That segment aims to make oper- ational improvements at multiple intersections with new ramps.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 26. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NBFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. place for the duration of the work. Timeline: Dec. 2018-Sept. 2021 Cost: $8 million Funding source: city of New Braunfels 2013 bond program Morningside Drive Reconstruction Construction on Morningside Drive has been ongoing for more than two years and is anticipated to contin- ue through September. Issues with third-party utilities caused delays in the project, and detours will remain in

Castell Ave. work to continue throughDec. 2022

TORREY ST.

ELIZABETH AVE.

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

The eastern portion extends from the San Antonio intersection to the I-35 frontage road. Temporary road closures are anticipated throughout the project, though the majority of the work will be conducted overnight, and crews will not work in the downtown area on weekends, according to NBU. Funding for the project is part of $14.7 million NBU has budgeted to upgrade existing water and sewer infrastructure throughout the city.

New Braunfels Utilities in May began construction on the Castell Avenue 24-inch Water Line Project. The project is expected to last through December 2022 and has been divided into two sections with sepa- rate contractors completing the work. The western portion of the project extends from the intersection of San Antonio Street and Castell to the intersection of Torrey Street and Elizabeth Avenue.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Comal County & New Braunfels

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

QUOTEOFNOTE “WE’RE IN THE MIDDLE OF A

Improvement plan to be updated ahead of possible bond NEWBRAUNFELS On July 26, New Braunfels City Council autho- rized New Braunfels City Manager Robert Camareno to enter into an agreement with Freese & Nichols Inc. to update the city’s capital improvement plan, or CIP. The CIP is a community plan- ning and scal management tool used to coordinate the timing and nancing of capital projects over a ve-year period. Ocials most recently updated the CIP in 2012, and the new update would be utilized in planning for a possible 2023 bond election. Work on the CIP will be broken into two phases with the rst phase identifying capital needs, coordinating with stakeholders and engaging with the community. Capital projects identied will be incorporated into the CIP and could include projects focused on transportation, drainage, parks and city facilities. The CIP will include a preliminary list of capital projects to be evalu- ated and prioritized by City Council and the bond advisory committee, which is expected to be appointed between October and December. Phase 2 of the plan will include conducting preliminary design plans to nalize the CIP with the bond advisory committee, City Council and city sta. Through the agreement, funding to Freese & Nichols for Phase 1 will not exceed $300,000, and funding for Phase 2 will be determined when Phase 1 is complete.

Many properties along Hwy. 46 and FM 758 have been developed into residential neighborhoods in recent years as the city’s population continues to boom. The proposed 105-acre development could add about 500 homes. SOURCES: CITY OF NEW BRAUNFELS, HMT ENGINEERINGCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER NEW NEIGHBORS

Proposed development

THE VILLAGE AT CLEAR SPRINGS

• 119 single-family lots • Building began in 2014

PERFECT STORM, ANDWE’RE DOING THE BESTWE CAN.” NEW BRAUNFELS COUNCIL MEMBER JUSTIN MEADOWS ON THE NEED FOR INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS AS THE CITY EXPERIENCES RAPID GROWTH NUMBER TOKNOW The amount of conrmed and probable COVID-19 cases reported in Comal County in July. It is the most cases reported in the county in one month since January. 1,233 HIGHLIGHTS COMAL COUNTY On July 15, Comal County commissioners approved Aria to serve as the new police K-9 for the Precinct 3 constable’s oce, which serves the New Braunfels area. Aria will replace the former precinct K-9, Rocki, who will continue to be active through visits to elementary schools in New Braunfels ISD and Comal ISD. NEWBRAUNFELS City Council members on July 26 adopted a tax increment nancing, or TIF, policy that outlines processes for evaluating the creation of tax increment reinvestment zones within city limits. Through TIF, local municipalities are able to earmark increased tax revenue within a specic geographic area to oset the cost of infrastructure improvements deemed necessary to attract private investment, according to city ocials. City ocials said the primary purpose of TIF is to encourage economic development in areas where it would not have occurred without the benets and assistance provided by TIF. New Braunfels City Council Meets second and fourth Mondays at 6 p.m. at 550 Landa St., New Braunfels.830-221-4000 www.nbtexas.org Comal County Meets Thursdays at 8:30 a.m. at 100 Main Plaza, second oor, New Braunfels. 830-221-1100 www.co.comal.tx.us Guadalupe County Meets Tuesdays at 10 a.m. at 101 E. Court St., Seguin. 830-303-8869 www.co.guadalupe.tx.us MEETINGSWE COVER

758

VILLAGE SPRINGS

• 270 apartments • Not yet open SKY AT CLEAR SPRINGS APARTMENTS • 309 lots • Currently under construction DEER CREST

46

DEER CREST DR.

N

Rezoning couldmakeway for single-familyhomesalongFM758

NEWBRAUNFELS During a July 26 meeting, City Council mem- bers unanimously approved the rst reading of an ordinance to rezone approximately 105 acres to allow for zero lot-line homes in which a house can be constructed near the edge of the property line. The property located at 1621 FM 758, New Braunfels, was previously zoned agricultural/pre-development, airport hazard overlay district. Under the new zoning, the property owner could construct detached, single-family residences. The development will consist of approximately 500 one- and two-story single-family homes, said Caroline McDonald, who spoke on behalf of the property owner. Several New Braunfels residents from surrounding properties spoke in opposition to the rezoning, citing drainage issues along the roadway

and signicant increases in trac on FM 758 and Hwy. 46. The high volume of trac along those roads makes it dicult for area residents to travel through the city, said Karen Davis, who lives at an adjacent property, and several other housing developments are underway along the road. “This is a zoning case, so I have to base my decision on whether or not it is appropriate to have single-fam- ily homes in that area,” Council Member Justin Meadows said. “And my guess is you would probably much rather prefer that over some commercial development.” Because Hwy. 46 is managed by the Texas Department of Trans- portation, council cannot make changes to the road, Meadows said. City Council is expected to vote on the second and nal reading of the ordinance in August.

City Council moves to restrict parking around downtown traffic circle

NEWBRAUNFELS City Council on July 26 approved an ordinance to restrict parking around the islands on the outside edges of Main Plaza in downtown New Braunfels. A request for the restrictions was made by the New Braunfels Parks and Recreation Department after employees were unable to access the landscaping to perform cleaning and maintenance.

The restrictions would prevent parking around the islands outside of existing parking spots. Though the areas are not desig- nated for parking, no ordinances existed to restrict parking. Following the approval of the item, the city will install trac-con- trol signs that cost $150 each and will be funded in the approved 2021 streets and drainage budget.

The city formally restricted some parking around the trac circle.

NO PARKING

Restricted parking

SOURCE: CITY OF NEW BRAUNFELS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

SAN ANTONIO ST.

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021

PUBL I C EDUCAT ION EDI T ION

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSOR

The Pillars is a dedicated team of educators, professionals, and community-minded people. Together, over more than a decade, they have built The Pillars Experience — designed to give children an engaging and exciting learning journey that prepares them for what’s ahead. The ultimate goal for the Pillars team is to help raise up a generation of children whose well-rounded and holistically-driven early education leads them to become Pillars themselves – Pillars of strength and integrity in their churches, in their families, and in their communities.

DISTRICT DATA

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

Located in the heart of New Braunfels, New Braunfels ISD serves more than 9,000 students. As the city has grown, enrollment has increased, and the district is working to build schools to accommodate students. NEWBRAUNFELS ISD

COMAL ISD

15 campuses 578 teachers

9,282 students

31 campuses 1,617 teachers

25,459 students

Covering 589 square miles, Comal ISD is one of the largest school districts in Texas and serves students from ve counties in Central Texas. CISD is working to build more schools throughout the area.

1845 year founded

1956 year founded

SOURCES: COMAL ISD, NEW BRAUNFELS ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Student enrollment *PROJECTED

Stang, salaries and substitutes Total number of teachers* Starting teacher salary

Superintendent salary

Substitute daily pay**

Percent change from 2018-19

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22*

26,579

25,459

25,089

$90- $100 $80- $90

23,935

+11.05%

9,560

9,541

9,282

9,127

+4.74%

*TOTAL IS THE FULLTIME EQUIVALENT AND MAY INCLUDE PARTTIME POSITIONS. **RANGES VARY BASED ON EXPERIENCE AND OTHER FACTORS.

202021 student statistics

202021 revenue sources 202122 revenue sources

TOTAL REVENUE:

TOTAL REVENUE:

TOTAL REVENUE:

TOTAL REVENUE:

Economically disadvantaged students

English Language Learners

Special education students

$104.24M

$219.27M

$109.76M

$227.56M

40.05% 8.59% 10.84% 31.17% 5.31% 12.76%

LOCAL

LOCAL

LOCAL

LOCAL

Statewide

$79.07M

$185.11M

$86.28M

$196.42M

STATE

$31.9M STATE

STATE

STATE

60.19% 20.64%

11.26%

$22.95M FEDERAL $2.22M

$20.11M FEDERAL $3.37M

$27.97M FEDERAL $3.17M

$2.26M FEDERAL

13

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2021

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The Importance of Early Childhood Education

A diverse collection of research demonstrates that the years before kindergarten – the first 60 months of a child’s life — are critical for the development of language, social-emotional, and cognitive skills. During this time, children’s minds are like sponges as their brain grows and the synapsis for healthy communication are formed. Even from the earliest ages, high quality interaction strengthens these syn- apses and provides the best opportunities for long term development. It’s widely accepted that children who have access to quality early learning are better prepared for the rest of their academic journeys. And far beyond, too. Children who have that access tend excel in elementary school, have higher grades and test scores in high school, are more likely to attend college and even receive post graduate degrees. They tend to have higher incomes when they enter the workplace, have stable social networks, and grow into well-adjusted as adults. Children that do not participate in a high-quality early childhood education program can be up to 18 months behind by the time they get to Kindergarten, leaving them to play catch-up in some of the most crucial moments of their education. The Pillars Christian Learning Center is a premier early learning center that focuses on the whole child — including academic, spiritual and socio-emotional development. How do we do that? We’re so glad you asked! Our teachers and administrators are dedicated, experienced, and passionate. We support them with constant training and development. Our facilities are designed for ideal learning environments. Spacious and bright, with classrooms that are meticulously and intentionally equipped with age-appro- priate furnishings and learning materials. We built a team to search far and wide for our award-wining curriculum that emphasizes both the academic and spiritual development. We believe that by leading the industry in both areas, we are uniquely enabled to nurture every child to their fullest potential. We utilize the Experience Early Learning™ System, a research-based program that focuses equally on all areas of child development: social-emotional, physical, language and cognitive. The curriculum uniquely weaves 33 key skills into playful games, hands-on activities, and scholastic projects. Children explore the world through carefully designed and thematic investigations. These themes help children know who they are, while learning to love others and make healthy life choices. Each day, Pillars kids sing songs, create art, investigate STEM projects, play math and literacy games, read books and build friendships. The Experience God curriculum invites children to develop a personal relationship with Jesus. To come to an understanding of the love He has for them, and to build Christian character. Children engage in circle time and activities based on Bible stories. Through art, songs, and playful games, children learn that God is all-loving, just, wise, and all-powerful. The hands-on activities nurture honesty, patience, empathy, forgiveness, and a servant-heart. At The Pillars, we don’t simply say that we are excellent at preparing children for kindergarten and what lies beyond. We’ve made it our mission to prove it. We

are accredited by the Texas Rising Star program. This program measures the quality and effectiveness of many Texas early childhood programs. We also utilize CLI Engage — a comprehensive assessment platform for highly qualified early childhood programs that measures the quality of the curriculum and its effectiveness, while serving as a benchmark for our teachers. By participating in the program, we can compare our students’ development against other learning centers in a 19-county region around the San Antonio/Austin area, including Bexar, Comal, Guadalupe, and Travis counties. For over a year, we’ve been working to implement CLI Engage into our classrooms, and we have been thrilled with the results. In the 2020/2021 school year, CLI Engage assessments for Pre-K Readiness have shown us that The Pillars Pre-K students scored 15% higher on Reading Readiness, Phonologi- cal Awareness, Math, Science and Social Emotional Behaviors than the regional average. To us, this is proof positive that a learning center with a holistic approach to every student as an individual can make a difference that lasts a lifetime. We want to help raise up the next generation of leaders for our com- munities and far beyond. We believe the work we do every day helps to ensure that future becomes a reality. Even as we strive for brighter futures, we are always driven by our core values: Development. Compassion. Integrity. Faith. We invite our team members and families to become partners in this endeavor to shape the lives of children far beyond their preschool years. A dedication to the Four Pillars and a commitment to ensuring their application ensures that The Pillars Christian Learning Center will remain our region’s best early learning centers for decades to come, forming the next generation of Pillars in our communities, our nation, and our world.

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

FIRST LOOK

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

NewBraunfelsMiddle School slated to open for 202122 year

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

and choir areas, four tennis courts and a multiuse eld, according to the district. A multiuse hub is located in the center of the school and includes a dining space, a library, exible classrooms, a performance area and student collaboration zones, Langer said. “The variety of spaces will give teachers and students the exibility to choose the right space depending on the learning activity,” Langer said. “The building layout is designed for after-hours and community use of the facility and has controlled access to the gyms and performing spaces.” Beginning in the 2021-22 school year, the current middle school, which is located at 4150 Klein Mead- ows, will become the Ninth Grade Center, and the district has plans to expand the building into a full high school in coming years.

Construction of the new New Braunfels Middle School is now substantially complete with students expected to begin the 2021-22 school year Aug. 23. Design work for the 189,500-square- foot building began in 2018, and construction started in June 2019, said Shivani Langer, principal for Stantec Architecture Inc. Rain delays and unavailability of some building components due to the coronavirus pandemic impacted the project, Langer said, but the deadline for completion remained unchanged. Funding for the $54 million school was secured through New Braunfels ISD’s 2018 bond program. The facility will have a capacity of 1,500 students and will replace the existing middle school. The new building has 12 science labs, three computer labs, full band

MOVING IN Construction on New Braunfels Middle School began in 2019, and the campus will open for students in fall 2021. The building is the newest addition to the district.

The new facility will be open for the 202122 school year. (Courtesy Stantec Architecture)

67 classrooms

12 science labs

3 computer labs

1,275-1,300 students anticipated this fall

N

SOURCES: NEW BRAUNFELS ISD, STANTEC ARCHITECTURE INC.COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION NewBraunfels school districts prepare to assess individual student learning

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

STAAR

gains and losses Scores from the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness and End-of- Course Assessments are divided into several categories. Students who score at “approaches grade level” or above are considered to have passed the exam. Comal ISD New Braunfels ISD State

LAUREN CANTERBERRY

thought we were still marching to a normal school year.” Districts that oered more in-per- son instruction saw fewer declines in scores, Morath said. Both NBISD and CISD began the 2020-21 school year with the option for parents to send their children to in-person instruction. Both districts saw the majority of students return to campus by the end of the year, which Kristen Lueck, CISD assistant superintendent of curriculum and instructional design, said contributed to students’ perfor- mance on the assessments. “We didn’t drop [in scores] as much as other districts may have,” Lueck said. “We also encouraged parents to bring students back into the buildings if they were able to, because we know that that was the best way to actually get the students back on track.” In preparation for the 2021-22 school year, Bock and Lueck said that the districts use pre-assessments at the beginning of the year to deter- mine each student’s learning level before developing a plan to teach skills a student may be missing. “It’s ‘just-in-time acceleration’ throughout the year, based on those skills that are necessary for that time of that unit of study,” Lueck said. To assist teachers with addressing learning gaps in the classroom, NBISD has hired additional instruc- tional interventionists and coaches. “It’s not about pulling every kid out into an intervention class; it’s really strengthening what they get [in the classroom],” Bock said.

After test scores for the spring 2021 State of Texas Assessments of Aca- demic Readiness and End-of-Course Assessments were released June 28, districts across the state began developing plans to address learning loss attributed to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. During a June 28 Texas State Board of Education press conference, Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath said the state saw a 15% decline in the percentage of students performing at or above grade level in mathematics compared to 2019. The state also reported a 4% decline in the percentage of students reading at or above grade level. In New Braunfels and Comal ISDs, students’ scores did not decline as drastically. According to TEA data, the per- centage of students that approached grade-level expectations for math in fth grade declined by 5% in NBISD and 4% in CISD compared to 2019 while state totals declined by 14%. The percentage of students that approached grade level in fth-grade reading did not change from 2019 in NBISD and declined by 3% in CISD and 5% throughout the state. Kara Bock, assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction for NBISD, said she expected declines in science and math that were dicult to convert to a virtual format. “I think the science I was probably a little bit more surprised than I was with math,” Bock said. “But there were pockets where you would have

5TH GRADE MATH

DID NOT MEET

APPROACHES

2019 2021

11% 15% +4%

9%

17% 31%

2019 2021

89% 85% -4%

91% 86% -5%

83% 69% -14%

14% +5%

+14%

% change

% change

5TH GRADE READING

DID NOT MEET

APPROACHES

2019 2021

12% 15% +3%

2019 2021

88% 85% -3%

15% 15% 0%

23% 28% +5%

85% 85%

77% 72% -5%

0%

% change

% change

ENGLISH I/EOC

DID NOT MEET

APPROACHES

2019 2021

19% 18% -1%

16% 17% +1%

2019 2021

81% 82% +1%

37% 34% -3%

84% 83%

63% 66% +3%

-1%

% change

% change

ALGEBRA/EOC

DID NOT MEET

APPROACHES

2019 2021

9% 12% +3%

2019 2021

91% 88% -3%

5%

16% 28% +12%

95% 81% -14%

84% 72% -12%

19%

+14%

% change

% change

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NBISD has hired seven new instruc- tional coaches to assist at the elemen- tary level, four at the secondary level, two at the school of choice and one new teacher in each middle school to reduce class sizes. Both districts plan to return to in-person instruction this fall, and

teachers and sta will work with students to develop plans to incor- porate missing skills throughout the new curriculum. “It’s really looking at each individ- ual student and what they are not performing well in,” Bock said. “How are we going to accelerate them?”

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NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • AUGUST 2021

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