Lindsey Graham tweets he would ‘go to war’ for Chick-fil-A

Sen. Lindsey Graham, a Republican from South Carolina, tweeted Wednesday that he would “go to war” for Chick-fil-A. (Evelyn Hockstein/Pool via AP)

Sen. Lindsey Graham, a Republican from South Carolina, tweeted Wednesday that he would “go to war” for Chick-fil-A. (Evelyn Hockstein/Pool through AP)

AP

Sen. Lindsey Graham explained he would “go to war” for Chick-fil-A in reaction to pupil attempts at the University of Notre Dame to retain the fast food chain off campus about worries about meat consumption and its stance on LGBTQ problems.

Previously this month, two students wrote a letter to the editor of the university’s pupil newspaper, The Observer, pushing back on the probable addition of a Chick-fil-A to the school’s dining solutions and outlining their “serious moral concerns” about the business.

The letter asked other students to indicator an open up letter to the university’s Campus Dining in opposition to the addition of Chick-fil-A and to “call on pupil and school leaders” to prevent owning the cafe cater campus events.

Graham, a Republican in the U.S. Senate from South Carolina, tweeted Wednesday that it was “disappointing to hear” that some at the university want to “ban Chick-fil-A from performing business on campus for the reason that they disagree with the values held by the Chick-fil-A founders.”

“What a unsafe precedent to set,” Graham tweeted.

He went on to say he needs “everyone in South Carolina and across America to know” he has Chick-fil-A’s back again.

“I hope we never have to, but I will go to war for the concepts Chick-fil-A stands for,” he wrote. “Great food. Wonderful provider. Good values. God bless Chick-fil-A!”

This is not the 1st time Chick-fil-A has confronted pushback against opening a franchise. Previously this thirty day period, lawmakers in New York questioned the New York Condition Thruway Authority to reconsider adding Chick-fil-A dining places to up to date service regions on the Thruway, regional outlet WROC noted.

The chain has lengthy faced controversy for its donations to organizations that have a history of taking anti-LGBTQ stances, which includes opposing same-sexual intercourse marriage. The business reported in 2019 that it would only be donating to companies that “work in the areas of homelessness, hunger and schooling starting in 2020.”

But the Notre Dame college students who wrote the letter to the editor claimed their “first concern” is “Chick-fil-A’s extended heritage of antagonism towards the LGBTQ+ community” and its donations to “groups that oppose LGBTQ+ legal rights.”

They accused Chick-fil-A of “participation in animal agriculture,” which they named “environmentally unsustainable.”

“North The usa has an obsession with meat like no other nation on Earth and it is helping wipe out the earth,” the students wrote in the letter.

The pupils also said Notre Dame doesn’t want far more rapid food stuff restaurants.

“Consisting mostly of fried chicken and potatoes, the menu at Chick-fil-A does not provide an array of options suited for a varied campus community,” they wrote. “Vegetarians and vegans, a escalating minority of the university student entire body, would acquire minor advantage from a fried hen restaurant. Also, a cafe closed on Sundays is not most effective for a bustling, hungry university campus.”

The letter pointed to an Instagram put up from Notre Dame’s Campus Eating, which clarified that the college does not have a deal with Chick-fil-A.

“Campus Dining is at this time conducting a extensive retail dining master approach and is taking into consideration a range of alternatives, such as Chick-fil-A,” the post mentioned.

The pupils wrote that “Chick-fil-A is not the answer”

“There are superior possibilities that would the two greatly enhance the array of on-campus dining possibilities and support the very well-currently being of an increasingly various college student system,” they wrote.

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Bailey Aldridge is a reporter covering real-time news in North and South Carolina. She has a degree in journalism from the College of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.